By Joshua Tucker

Cipro Tendonitis
Is NOT Regular Tendonitis

Cipro Tendonitis is the little cousin of Levaquin Tendonitis.

Both are in the 'Fluoroquinolone' family of antibiotics and create cytotoxic damage to connective tissue in the human body, as well as a variety of other side effects.

Levaquin causes damage more often than Cipro, but that doesn't mean that it causes -less damage-.

The most recognized damage that Ciprofloxacin causes is tendonitis. This page will describe exactly what that means.



Cipro Tendonitis

Go here if you want to know about the side effects of Cipro.

Tendonitis caused by Cipro is an ENTIRELY different animal that normal Tendonitis.

Even though both are called Tendonitis, please do not consider them as even close to being the same kind of problem.

Trust me, Tendonitis is no big deal. Cipro Tendonitis is a BIG deal. And it's a deal that you want nothing to do with. Unfortunately, most people don't know about it till it's too late.

This page specifically is going to talk about the Tendonitis aspect of Cipro, as opposed to the anxiety, claustrophobia, nervous system and brain damage, organ damage, etc.

So. How does Cipro damage a tendon?


Magnesium Depletion

Cipro and other quinolones like Levaquin and Avelox pull nutrients from the body.

A person takes cipro, and suddenly their body has reduced levels of magnesium. This is what causes the anxiety, muscle pain, muscle cramps and twitches, tinnitis, etc.

If you're lucky, that's the only downside you experience and eventually your body gets enough magnesium fed into it that the symptoms go away and you're as good as new.

But many people that take Cipro tendon damage aren't so lucky.

Why?

Because they experience more than just a drop in magnesium levels. They experience -depletion- of magnesium.

This means that cells die.


Cipro And Magnesium

Technically there's a long chain of events, of cause and effect, but on a very simple level, it goes like this:

Cipro in --> Magnesium depletion --> poor operation and mitochondrial (the power plants of the cells) death --> cell death --> tendon structures literally fall apart --> toxicity from cell death --> body unable to remove toxicity fast enough so more damage happens --> cascade of resulting side effects of toxicity and nutritional deficiency.



Cipro Cytotoxicity

And it gets worse. Or it can, at least.

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics attack bacteria by attacking their DNA. Unfortunately, bacterial DNA isn't the only DNA affected. Research has shown the the DNA of tendon connective tissue can be attacked also.

** This is a key reason that Cipro Tendonitis can last forever, and get worse over time! **

When DNA is damaged, tendon cells still regrow, but the new cells grow back damaged.

So while we assume our tendon is damaged and it will heal back good as new, that just doesn't happen, because it is literally healing 'bad'.

And this keeps the cascade of pain causing dynamic in place over time.

Plus, generally, people don't replace their magnesium, or other necessary nutrition, so if they don't get better within a year or so, it's unlikely they are going to.


Healing Cipro Tendonitis

Cipro Tendonitis is caused by nutritional depletion (Magnesium and others) and potential DNA damage.

Cipro Tendonitis lasts so long because people don't fill their body with enough nutrition to give their bodies a fighting chance of recovering.

And with DNA damage, the only chance of overcoming that is by having your body be so healthy that good cells will outgrow the bad cells.

On both topics, it's more complex that that of course, but it's a good place to start.

Unfortunately, doctors and western medicine don't have much if anything to offer. Most doctors don't even believe there's a correlation between the Cipro you just took and the side effects you suddenly developed after taking it.

You're going to need a plan. I suggest that you get The Levaquin Tendonitis Solution ebook.

You'll get a complete explanation of what's going on, and a complete plan on what to do, and how to do it, to get your body to a place where it has a chance of overcoming the negative factors involved.

Sitting around and hoping it goes away someday isn't likely to get you the results that you want.

Cipro Tendonitis is the kind of problem you have to go after. It's going to take some effort and some diligence and possibly some patience.


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Levaquin Tendonitis Treatment


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