Plantar Fasciotomy
It's Like a Lobotomy For Your Foot!


Plantar Fasciotomy is the name of the procedure used for the 'treatment' of severe Plantar Fasciitis injury.

Ideally, this procedure is reserved for people with severe pain -and- pain located at the heel of the foot.

A Plantar Fasciotomy is an endoscopic procedure, which means that is is done with an endoscope to cause much less damage than 'normal' surgical techniques.

A surgeon in a doctor's office or outpatient surgical clinic usually performs the 20-60 minute long operation under local anesthesia.

Two small incisions are made on either side of the heel.

The endoscope goes in one hole, and a tiny cutting tool in the other.

A section of the thick Plantar Fascia is cut from the heel, then the incisions are closed.

Plantar Fasciotomy is generally an outpatient procedure, and most people can walk away after recovering from the anesthesia.



What is really happening during the surgery?

The Plantar Fascia is a tough sheet of connective tissue that connects to -everything- on the underside of the foot.

Many sources define it as a ligament that connects the heel of the foot to the bone at the base of your toes.

Connective tissue connects to -EVERYTHING-, which effectively means that the Plantar Fascia is a continuous complex of tissue connecting to every bone, every muscle, every nerve, every everything in your foot.

The surgery for Plantar Fasciitis is directed at 'injury' close to where the Plantar Fasciitis meets the heel bone.

Medical minds decided that to decrease the pain, they would cut the band of Fascia away from the bone.


This method theoretically reduces pain by taking tension off the site of injury. The pressure caused by stepping/standing on the foot can no longer put tension on the injury site when you sever the connection.

That's like chopping off your foot because you accidentally stepped on a nail.


The Plantar Fascia serves a purpose. If you cut it in half, it can no longer do it's job.

Something else will have to do it's job for it! Like a bridge held up by suspension cables, if you cut one or two away, something else has to take up the weight and movement.

A Plantar Fasciotomy leaves your foot structurally unstable, and sets you up to have DIFFERENT foot pain problems further down the road.

In the three weeks it takes to 'recover' from the surgery, you could heal your pain if you get the RIGHT information.

The Tendonitis dynamic happening in your foot is a complex, progressive mechanism that makes your foot less and less structurally sound.

Because of the variables of this mechanism, surgery ultimately cannot cure Tendonitis related issues like Plantar Fasciitis.

Keep reading to find more of the RIGHT information.


Options that get recommended before surgery rarely work.

Common medical thinking considers that Plantar Fasciotomies are appropriate for most people whose foot problems cannot be resolved in any other way.

But when you look at the methods they are talking about, you'll see that they have little chance of working in the first place.

Plantar Fasciitis is a wear and tear injury, and


Rest can't cure it.


Corticosteroid injections can't cure it.


Anti-Inflammatory drugs can't cure it.

People start to have pain, they continue to have pain, and they 'learn to live with it.'


What Can Work?

Icing can help, but only if done right!
Orthotics can help.

If the foot's arch is supported form collapsing so much that it puts undue strain on the Plantar Fascia, this will reduce wear and tear injury.

Losing weight can definitely help. The less weight that is putting pressure on the structures of the foot, the better.


Want To Cure Your Plantar Fasciitis?


Inflammation and the Pain Causing Dynamic are a HUGE portion of the pain you are experiencing.

You can make most if not all of it go away at home if you learn

How To Reduce Inflammation.
That plus the other info and tips you'll find on this website is the free advice....







For a related page, see Plantar Fasciitis Surgery.
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