Sharp Electric Pain When I Bend My Wrist Back

by Allataken

I have a two inch long swelling on the under side (palm side) of my right forearm, starting at the base of my wrist and running down my forearm toward my elbow.

This swelling is slightly right of the center of the forearm. I only occasionally have a low grade, dull, throbbing pain in my wrist or forearm. The bigger issues are that my palm is numb and when I bend my wrist hard backward, like when doing push-up, I get a sharp electric like pain running from my palm into my forearm.

I have stopped doing push-ups and try not to bend my wrist in this direction, and the numbness has lessened and the electric pain is harder to duplicate now.

Interestingly, I noticed the palm numbness and electric pain a week to ten days before the tendon swelling.

Any thoughts?


Joshua Answers:

Hi there.

It sounds like the muscles and connective tissue in your forearm, that wraps the wrist, hand, forearm, the tendons that cross the joint, etc, are too tight.

That's the Tendonitis dynamic.

Specifically tight such that when you bend your wrist back, it compresses/pinches/pulls on the carpal tunnel.

And since the nerve that passes through the carpal tunnel is wrapped in connective tissue that is connected to all that other connective tissue, and since it's all shrunkwrapped down, the nerve gets squeezed/irritated.

Technically, that qualifies you as having Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

This page will describe what causes each specific Carpal Tunnel Symptoms.

More questions, more answers.

Please reply using the comment link below. Do not submit a new submission to answer/reply, it's too hard for me to find where it's supposed to go.

And, comments have a 3,000 character limit so you may have to comment twice.

Joshua Tucker, B.A., C.M.T.
The Tendonitis Expert

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Dec 14, 2014
Same, after ice dipping
by: Knit_Head


I have experienced problems with my hands for the last 10 years ever since driving from CA to CO. I've tried many remedies, but cold has always felt the I think my body has been trying to get me to ice dip for years!

I just came across the site and immediately (and literally) rolled up my sleeves to get started. After about three 'dips' I noticed a pronounced 'twang' in my wrist as I toweled off. It is on the inside/palm side and when palpated sends this same electric shock feeling into my pointer and middle fingers (both right and left wrists).

I feel like this is a sign that some of the inflammation surrounding this area is being reduced making it easier to trigger this 'twang'. Does that sound right and if so, does that generally subside with time? As much as I like the overall relief, the twang is odd and I'm not especially keen on the feeling. :-)

This being said, after just one 2 hour period of ice dipping, the feeling of being swollen is greatly reduced.

I am also stepping up my mag and B6. Thank you for all of the time and effort you have put into this site and for generously making so much of it available without cost.


Joshua Comments:

I'm not sure about the twang as I'm not sure if you mean a nervy kind of twang or a guitar string too tight tendon kind of twang, but ice dipping is very effective at what it's effective at: reducing pain and increasing circulation.

And good things happen from that. More good things with adequate magnesium etc.

So while ice dipping isn't a fix, it's a huge plus in the process.

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