Tendonitis Surgery

For the record, in the vast majority of cases, I'm a big thumbs down to Tendonitis Surgery.

Primarily because while the tendon -may- have scar tissue build up, and likely is in fact irritated and inflamed, surgery on that spot doesn't address the CAUSE of the scar tissue and inflammation.

Said another way, where the surgeon performs surgery is where pain and problem ENDS UP, but is not where that painful Tendonitis dynamic BEGINS.


Will Tendonitis Surgery Help?

Maybe.

Many people get good results from surgery for their particular kind of Tendonitis.

Then again, many people tell me they are pleased with their surgery, even as they describe to me all their remaining symptoms and state that they're still recovering from the surgery 6 months later.

And then there's the people who were actually damaged by their surgery and have WORSE symptoms years later.

Here's the thing: Surgery is done on ONE SPOT. But Tendonitis is due the the ecology of the entire structure.

If you don't deal with ALL the factors that make up a Tendonitis problem, then it's unlikely that your symptoms are going to go away for very long, if at all. Surgery makes the Process of Inflammation worse, not better.


gloved hand and scalpel
Very, Very Sharp!


What if you are having pain ONLY due to Magnesium deficiency? What if your Carpal Tunnel Symptoms are from Vitamin B6 deficiency? Did you know that Inflammation Causes Vitamin B6 Deficiency

Surgery won't help in those cases, because obviously surgery doesn't deal with the nutritional deficiency.


What if you have tendon pain because your muscles and connective tissue are too tight? And then what if your surgeon does a tendon release surgery?

The muscles and connective tissue will still be tight, and will get EVEN TIGHTER as your nervous system responds to the injury the Tendonitis surgery causes. And your tendon, which -was- healthy, is now damaged. (Which, ironically, causes Tendonitis.)


There Are Two Types Of Tendonitis, with damage and without.

If there's no damage to the tendon, surgery will only injure it, not help it. And if a tendon is painful, but there's no damage, why do surgery?

Doctors should know that you can have pain without any physical damage, yet they do surgery anyway.


Then Comes Tendonitis Surgery


After you do everything your doctor tells you to do, and the usual treatments 'fail', then surgery is next on the list.

But the treatments didn't fail. Rest, Anti-inflammatory drugs like Ibuprofen, Wrist splints and braces, etc, are the WRONG tools for the job, so they never had much of a chance of helping in the first place.

Your doctor failed to help you, and is now saying the surgery is necessary. He was wrong on all the other prescriptions, why would he be correct about this one?

There are MANY good reasons to Quiz Your Doctor about Tendonitis surgery.


Is Tendonitis Surgery Safe?

Safe is a relative term.

Surgery causes injury, period. The question is, is the benefit worth the risk?

Many people at this Plantar Fasciitis Surgery Stories page and this Carpal Tunnel Surgery Stories page fervently wish that they had never had their surgeries.

The fact is, it's a crap shoot. If it works, GREAT! But if it doesn't, you usually end up worse off than you were before.

And when you look at Carpal Tunnel Surgery Statistics you'll notice that the definition of 'successful surgery' means 'reduced pain', not 'it's fixed'.

Like I often say, wouldn't you feel stupid if you went in for, say, Carpal Tunnel Surgery, the surgeon accidentally nicked your nerve, you now have permanent nerve damage, and -then- you find out that that original numbness and tingling was actually coming from up at your neck/shoulder/chest and NOT from your wrist?

Or if you just had Vitamin B6 deficiency, or TIGHT muscles in your forearm that could easily be loosened?

I'd feel dumb if that happened to me.

Tendonitis Surgery can be safe, but it can also set you up for a variety of negative experiences, like infection, nerve damage, increased pain levels, irritation of the original Pain Causing Dynamic, etc.


Should I get Tendonitis Surgery?

Should you get Tendonitis Surgery?

It's really up to you.

Your body, your choice.

Some people don't mind the thought of surgery. Personally, it creeps me out, and I'm going to avoid it if at all possible.

Once upon a time I was scheduled for emergency surgery for my ruptured L5_S1 disc. That night I found two books that literally in two days allowed me to go from only being able to be on my feet for 10 minutes at a time to being on my feet all day long. Needless to say, I cancelled the next day's surgery.

The point is, even things that seem like they require surgery, don't necessarily.

Surgery for carpal tunnel or tennis elbow or wrist tendonitis, etc, may seem like minor surgeries, but they're still surgery, and even if everything goes perfect, there's no guarantee it's going to make anything better.

And you still have to recover from the surgery itself, even if everything goes perfect.

And remember, even if you feel better after surgery, surgery does NOT reduce any of the factors that caused the problem in the first case.

Yes, there are people that get great results from surgery. Everybody and every situation and every doctor is different.

You pay your money and take your chances. There's no money back guarantee.

So if you're saying "But I've tried every Tendonitis treatment there is," you might want to look around a little more and try something else.

You'll find the RIGHT tool for the job sooner or later.





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