Does tendonitis include snapping and clicking at the elbow?

I have been an office manager for 18 years. Due to having a desk job, I suffer with pain in my elbow, shoulder, rotator cuff & shoulder blade.

With this includes inflammation in my forearm. I have dealt with these pain issues for over 2 years now.

Physiotherapy, acupuncture, massage, sports injury clinics & naturopathic visits have brought temporary relief, but not a cure.

I have been trying your ice dips and notice some relief, though again, just temporary. I wake up in the morning feeling fine, but after dressing & getting ready for work my pain starts to come back.

By mid-afternoon, I back to full on pain.

I have a lot of snapping and clicking at the elbow when I bend my arm. If I bend and click my arm, I actually feel some relief from the pain that has built up. It has now become a habit to bend and click throughout my day for relief. I have a feeling that all the snapping contributes to inflammation.

I have never had an x-ray to confirm my issues, though most agree that it is tendonitis.

I am interested in purchasing your DVD but don't want to waste more money and time if in fact my issue is something else. With all that I have read with regards to tendonitis, never has it mentioned anything about the tendon repeatedly snapping and clicking.

Can you confirm that this is part of tendonitis and if your DVD will help me with this problem too?


Joshua Answers:

Helly Snappy Elbow.

Yes, Tendonitis can include clicking, snapping, and self adjusting of the elbow.

Specifically for you, Tennis Elbow tendonitis.

As you said, you've hunched over a desk for years. Shoulders forward, neck forward, low back/hips flexed, lots of use of the hands and arms held in a specific position.

That's bad posture, and over time bad things happen.

So it's no surprise that you are experiencing chronic pain, and while some snapping when moving the elbow isn't super common, it's also not at all rare.

The clicking in your elbow is likely due to: too tight muscles

and too short connective tissue holding your structure/bones in such a way that you're a bit out of alignment, especially with movement.

When you bend/straighten your arm, your joint no longer follows a smooth flow, it now grinds a bit and has to 'pop'.

Snapping the elbow gives some relief for a variety of reasons, kind of like a chiropractic adjustment.

May or may not be causing inflammation.

There's ALREADY a Process of Inflammation in place, and it 's been there a long time. See: Pain Causing Dynamic.

To the extent that I can without having seen you in my office, that certainly sounds like a Tendonitis -dynamic-. Tight muscles, tight connective tissue, a history of poor posture and repetitive motion, tried everything your doctor has prescribed you and still hurting, etc.

One of many great things about my The Tennis Elbow Treatment That Works DVD is that there's a no questions asked money back guarantee.

Send it back for a full refund if you don't get benefit from following the plan.

Plus if you need some fine tuning once you get well into it, we can do that.

It gives you a complete plan that covers all the bases. Granted you have to do the work, but it's not complex or incredibly time consuming. Having said that, you will want to invest some time and effort into it until you're over the hump, so to speak.

More questions, more answers.

Please reply using the comment link below. Do not submit a new submission to answer/reply, it's too hard for me to find where it's supposed to go.

And, comments have a 3,000 character limit so you may have to comment twice.

Joshua Tucker, B.A., C.M.T.
The Tendonitis Expert

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Comments for Does tendonitis include snapping and clicking at the elbow?

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Nov 03, 2010
Thank you.
by: Lynn

Thank you for your advise and quick response to my concerns with snapping and clicking due to tendonitis...much appreciated.

I plan to invest in your DVD and I look forward to its' benefits and relief from the pain associated with it.

Regards, Lynn.


Joshua Comments:


Apr 15, 2015
popping while bending/straightening my elbow
by: CJ

I, too, experience a popping sound which is not a bone when i bend/straighten my elbow repeatedly. I do play tennis. I also suffer a neurological condition called "focal dystonia" in my affected right arm causing my forearm muscles to be extremely tight.

I think this excessive tightness in my entire arm and repetitive tennis motion has lead to this problem. At first it didnt hurt, just popped. Then it hurt so i stopped tennis for 4 months. Then the pain has mostly sugbsided but the popping still remains. I bought the DVD on a whim and i hope it will help my "unique" situation.


Joshua Comments:

Hi CJ.

What's your Vitamin D level?

Why exactly do you think you have a 'neurological condition'?

Does this thread seem relevant to your situation? Tendons Muscles And Tissue Making Noise All Of A Sudden

Apr 16, 2015
by: Anonymous

Hi I drink lots of whole milk. I drink a nutrition drink called shakeology daily and I take a multivitamin called activit daily which has 2000 IU vitamin D in it. All of these have vitamin d in it.

I went to about 20 different doctors before finally getting a diagnosis of focal dystonia over a year ago.

I had nerve test done on my entire right arm which came back perfect over a year ago.

I had active release technique therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic treatment as well. All of these I'm sure helped benefit my entire body but did not help with my movement condition.

My symptoms are in my right hand. I cannot open my thumb very well. I have full strength in my arm and hand but have irregular movements when moving the elbow and trying to use my hand for fine motor movements like typing and playing the guitar.

I really don't get pain much at all if any and I've been "retraining" my brain with slow movement exercises and the muscles in my forearm and hand have loosened up significantly but they have been tight for so long i think i have some "garbage" buildup in the forearm that i need to work out.

I'm able to play tennis again! Guitar, not so much due to the lack of fine motor movements.


Joshua Comments:

What is your Vitamin D level?

If you don't know, I'd find out asap.

Do you have any history of whiplash/head injury, car crash, falling off a horse, etc?

Did you ever break a bone (anywhere in that limb)?

Apr 16, 2015
Response to earlier
by: CJ

Hi I was the person you responded to earlier about the vitamin D levels. Yes they are sufficient.

I've never broken a bone in the limb. I haven't had whiplash either.


Joshua Comments:

What was your actual Vit D level number in 'ng/ml'?

Is it between 60-80ng/ml?

'Sufficient' is relative, depending on who you talk to. 'Sufficient' is subjective. What's the actual number?

There's very little Vit D in shakeology (200i.u.) or milk or multivits.

No whiplash or broken bone, ok that's good info.

When you got the active release work, did it help at all? For a few minutes, hours, days?

Apr 16, 2015
by: CJ

The Activit multivitamins I take daily says it has 2000 IU per dose. Before those vitamins I took gnc multi vitamin. Not sure what the dosages are there.

Can you recommend a supplement that you feel is sufficient amounts of vitamin D so I can start taking it?

As for active release, at the time of treatment I did not have the popping issue at all and it had 0 effect on my focal dystopia movement issues. It certainly didn't hurt but my popping started just this past November and at first it hurt but now it doesn't.


Joshua Comments:

Hi CJ.

Ok. I googled but couldn't find an Activit ingredients label.

MOST multi's have 400i.u.'s of Vit D at best.

How much you should take depends on what your level is. If your level is low, 2,000i.u.'s per day may or (probably) may not raise your levels, and not anytime soon.

The popping is -probably- a function of muscles and connective tissue getting tighter over time. This compresses the joint, and so it has to jump out of groove to some degree to complete the motion.

Either tightness, and/or poor function. Muscles can't fuction properly when short on Vit D and/or Magnesium (and/or various other nutrients).

My first thing would be to focus on nutrition. You got the ebook, so do what's suggested in there.

Definitely need your Vit D level between 60-80ng/ml (especially if you have worries re: neurologic issue).

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