Peroneal Tendonitis and lump on tendon Division 1 Cross country runner

by Div1

Hi Joshua,

I've been suffering from chronic pain in my foot and was diagnosed with peroneal tendonitis and possible partial tendon tears (in the peroneus brevis I believe).

I've been out of running now for about 14 weeks now and have been wearing an immobilizing boot for 2 weeks. When I feel the tendon on my foot with my finger, it feels extremely bumpy.

I was wondering what this bumpiness is and what I really need to do to get rid of this tendonitis for good.

Is lumpiness a sign of needed surgery?

Max R


Joshua Answers:

Hi Div1.

Sorry you've been out so long. I know runners hate that......I hate it too. Disabling injury is no fun, no matter what it is.

So. The way Achilles Tendonitis works, it's common to get a build up of scar tissue on the Achilles tendon.

Some of the bumpiness can just be from swelling caused by the Process of Inflammation.

You're also most likely looking at Tendonosis.

Tendonosis in the Achilles Tendon is caused by lack of circulation to the tendon. Reduced blood flow actually arriving to the cells need it results in reduced nutrition getting to those cells, those cells die, etc.

But you run a lot, historically. Which causes blood flow. So how could there be a circulation problem?

It's not really a circulation problem with you. It's a being received problem.

Your lower leg structures are TOO TIGHT. Not only does that restrict circulation, make your body work harder to walk and run, create more irritation, etc, but it also puts CONSTANT TENSION on the Achilles Tendon.

The tendon is pulled tight, taut. Tendon is already dense tissue. You go lengthening it, and it gets even denser. Thus, less nutrition gets to where it needs to go.

Then scar tissue builds up.

That's the basic explanation. There's more to it, of course, but in short you need to open up the structures of your lower leg. In some way other than the usual stretching.

Granted I'm biased, but I suggest you get my Reversing Achilles Tendonitis ebook.

Does a scar tissue build up require surgery? Not necessarily. Generally not. It really depends on what's going on in there.

Can you fix it yourself with time and work? Probably. Generally yes.

Sometimes bad tendonosis does need surgery, to literally cut out the dead/weak tissue in hopes that the body will grow it back. (Which still doesn't deal with the factors that caused it in the first place.)

For the record, I can't predict the health of your tendon from here. Maybe you have Tendonosis and degeneration of the tendon, maybe you just have scar tissue build up and swelling.

Having said that, regardless, you have to do the same work. Open up the structures of the lower leg, and manually rub the scar tissue area, the whole tendon, really.

Manually squeeze the sponge, forcing old stuff out and new stuff in (yes, that's medical terminology.....), to break up scar tissue and make dry crunchy tissue soft and mobile and gummy.

More questions, more answers.

Please reply using the comment link below. Do not submit a new submission to answer/reply, it's too hard for me to find where it's supposed to go.

And, comments have a 3,000 character limit so you may have to comment twice.

Joshua Tucker, B.A., C.M.T.
The Tendonitis Expert

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Comments for Peroneal Tendonitis and lump on tendon Division 1 Cross country runner

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May 19, 2012
Which tendon?
by: Anonymous

He said 'peroneal tendonitis' and you're talking about his achilles.


Joshua Comments:

That's a fair point, you're totally right. There's a sentence or two I left out of my response.

1. Achilles Tendonitis, tendonitis of the peroneal tendon, it's all the same.

2. With slight adjustment of location, everything in Reversing Achilles Tendonitis applies.

3. Even so, we think that if we have peroneal tendonitis and that it's isolated to just that muscle. But it's not. The calves and soleus are definitely in play with any peroneal problem.

4. Thanks for catching that error on my part.

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