Still in pain after Plantar Fasciitis Surgery............

by Dia
(Natchez, MS, USA)

I had been experiencing foot problems for years and was diagnosed with plantar fascitis.

I had surgery in September 2009 which gave no relief at all, I also went to physical therapy for 10 weeks after the first surgery.

After an MRI I was told that it had grown back and that keloid scar tissue had also formed and that a repeat surgery was necessary.

In March 2010 I had a repeat surgery and radiology treatments for the scar tissue not to form again.

Well it is the middle of June 2010 and am in more pain that ever. The Dr. said he does not know what to do and is sending me to another Dr. to see if he can do anything.

I am still in severe pain, I am starting to suffer from depression, I am (was)an active person but now I find everything I do I base on how bad my feet are going to hurt, some days I can't even walk without a cane.

If I had to do this all over I would never have had this surgery and just put up with the pain I had.



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Joshua Answers:

Hi Dia.

Ouch.

As you have discovered, Plantar Fasciitis and Tendonitis can be debilitating, and surgery isn't necessarily the answer.


Do this: Read the Process of Inflammation page, and then Ice Dip as described on the How To Reduce Inflammation page.

Do that for 10 days, maybe increasing the number of dips (the more the merrier), and let me know what happens.





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Joshua Tucker, B.A., C.M.T.
The Tendonitis Expert
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Comments for Still in pain after Plantar Fasciitis Surgery............

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Aug 10, 2012
Both Feet Collapsing Due To Surgeries
by: Terry in Southport

Both of my feet are collapsing due to heel spur surgery. The last ortho doctor told me there was nothing left to do other than some experimental, expensive treatments that insurance won't cover.

Now I wake up in the morning and reach for the pain medication. I rest a while longer while it begins to work so I can get on my feet to take a shower. I am in constant pain from my feet and now my back. It rules my life and decisions about my life.

I am 56 and I feel like I will soon be crippled from this. I was told the operations would stop my pain from heel spurs, but I wasn't told it would be a temporary fix and my feet could collapse and cripple me.

My ortho guy said the Podiatrists who operated on my feet should have never done what they did and they were not trained properly to treat these problems. Think long and hard before you have this surgery.

There's no going back and for me there's not much going forward!


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Joshua Comments:

In the majority of cases, I do not believe that there's 'no going forward'. Having said that, depending on what structural damage the surgery did or didn't do...

1. Where were the bone spurs?

2. What exactly did the surgery do?

3. What have you been doing for self care other than pain killers, pre and post surgery?



Apr 24, 2012
Do not do plantar fasciitis surgery!!!!!!
by: Dia Biglane

After having sugery fot plantar fasciitis twice and surgery on my Baxter nerve, I am still in constant pain. I now visit the pain management Doctor for relief of this chronic pain.
Never let a doctor come near your feet wth any surgical instrument.
Now not only am I dealing with chronic foot pain but I am addicted to pain medication.
Doctors do not always no know what they are doing!



Apr 13, 2012
Still in pain after surgery
by: Shelle

I was having plantar pain in Oct & Dec. 2011. Received 2 injections of cortizone. I got the last injection 2 days before leaving on vacation. While on vacation the tendon tore from the injection. They did the surgery to release the tendion in Feb. 2012. Since the surgery, I have been in so much pain that I can't stand it.

I constantly feels like someone is hitting me with a cattle prod. Where they ran the probe thru the bottom of the foot, it feels like I am standing on a rope all the time. My foot and ankle swells so bad that I can't get my shoe on and have been in a boot since Dec.

Doctor is suggesting surgery on the nerve in my ankle, but don't know what to do. It is hard to function daily with the amount of pain I am in. Looking for answers.


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Joshua Comments:

So the same surgeon that didn't fix the foot/feet with surgery the first time now wants to sever the nerve to the foot?

That sounds like a bad idea to me...

Cutting the pillars and cable supports of a bridge ALWAYS sounds like a bad idea to me. But it's what surgeons are trained to believe is the best idea in the world.

The fact of the matter is, your foot's been all jacked up. Surgery causes injury. Severing tendons drastically reduces the structural integrity of the foot, not to mention now there's a muscle that's not connected to anything anymore.

Plus a chronic acute Process of Inflammation, all the factors that caused the pain and problem in the first place, etc.

What are you doing for self care to try to make things better?




Apr 12, 2012
My Plantar Fasciitis is back 2 years after surgery
by: ysanchez

Hi I'm 46 yrs old and had foot pain many yrs ago for 2 yrs had cortisone shots to relieve pain at first they help the nothing thought I would go crazy with pain so my doctor schedules me for surgery no problem was told I would be back on my feet in 5 weeks but it lasted 2 yrs then finally was pain free now 12 yrs later its back.

I think I'm going to go crazy I'm in so much pain right now especially because I'm recovering from a lisfranc fracture from same foot well that's all for now .



May 10, 2011
Baxter Nerve Surgery /WORST
by: Dia Biglane

Well I had the surgery for decompression of the Baxter's nerve one year ago March. I also had radiation therapy for six weeks to stop the scar tissue from growing, the surgery made my right foot worse. The Doctors told me I am disabled and should try to collect disability payments.........I feel like I was thrown to the sharks. I am 50 and thses surgeries have changed my life forever, constant pain, pain management, can not do anything unless I think how it will effect my feet first. They say I had the best Doctor and it must just be my bodies reaction to these five surgeries. My advise DO NOT LET ANYONE TELL YOU SURGERY FOR YOUR FEET WILL MAKE IT BETTER. IT WILL NOT.

In pain for life,
Dia Biglane



May 01, 2011
Failed Plantar Fasciitis and 10 years later back problems
by: Kathleen

Hi,
I had both feet done for Plantar Fasciitis ten years ago. It did not work for me at all. Is it possible too much was cut because 10 years later there is bone protruding from the inside of my left foot?

I am not able to walk long distances. I have also had considerable back pain and have been diagnosed with degenerative disc disease. Is it possible the way I walk because of all this has contributed to my back pain? It has gotten progressively worse.

Do the therapy first is my advice, and keep at it.

I am only in my 50's and I used to be a very active, but because of this surgery it has changed my life.


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Joshua Comments:

Hi Kathleen.

Yes, both are possible.

1. Your foot is a complex structure designed to absorb load. When the plantar fascia is cut, it's basically like cutting some supports, or even pillars out from under a bridge.

You can imagine how the bridge might fall/collapse/reshape itself, i.e. the bone not being held in place.

2. If your feet can't absorb load, that load still has to transfer somewhere. To places like your knee and back. Thus back problems.



Aug 31, 2010
Third surgery for Plantar Fasciitis.....:)
by: Dia Biglane

Well I did the surgery to decompress the nerve on my left foot, no weight bearing for 4 weeks maybe 6. So far I really don't know the out come of this surgery. The last couple of days I have been putting a little pressure just to see how it feels, it does not feel like I was expecting.

I will keep you updated, as you are the one that seems to be the most honest concerning my situation.

Thank you.....


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Joshua Comments:

Hi Dia.

Do keep me posted.

And if you aren't ice dipping as frequently as possible (10 seconds/dip), I highly suggest that you start.


Jul 26, 2010
What do you think?
by: Dia

Thank you for the information that you have provided it has been very helpful.

I have another question for you. As you know I have had 2 separate plantar fasiotomy surgeries, my surgeon now has sent me for a second opinion with another surgeon.

The second surgeon suggested I have another plantar fasiotomy and neurolysis of the Baxter's nerve. My family physician and my orthopedic Dr. say no to the plantar surgery but say the neurolysis of the Baxter's nerve might be the problem. What are the benefits of this surgery?

What is the success rate of this surgery?

Could this surgery screw me up for life, I am pretty much screwed already with all this pain.

I am scheduled for the Baxter's nerve surgery on August 5. I am scared to the point of total stress and panic attacks. I need some input.


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Joshua Comments:

Well Dia, I'm the wrong guy to talk to for positive feedback about Plantar Fasciitis Surgery.

I'm heavily biased against it.

Here's a paragraph from myfootshop dot com.

"Surgical release of the nerve, called external neurolysis, is the preferred method of care. The procedure is completed in a surgery center or hospital setting. External neurolysis of Baxter's nerve may be performed with a local anesthetic and sedation or with a general anesthetic.

The goal of neurolysis is to identify the physical irritation or the nerve, release those strictures and allow the nerve to return to normal function. Recovery varies but typical neurolysis cases do require a period of non-weight bearing on crutches."


I can't even see what body part is in the picture, but imagine that they're cutting into your heel like that, and 'exploring' to try to find what is affecting the nerve.

Look how much damage they are causing. RIGHT NEXT TO A NERVE.

Personally, I wouldn't let anybody that close to a nerve unless my life depended on it. Because they're using very sharp objects. Sever or nick that nerve (which is thickly bound in connective tissue that they have to cut through to find/identify the nerve) and you're in a world of problem forever.

The first surgeries didn't work. I'm not a big fan of the thought process that leads to "Well, let's try another surgery then. We'll definitely get it this time!" *fingers crossed hopefully*

Your doctors are saying the nerve in the heel MIGHT be the problem. MAYBE isn't a good enough reason in my book to cut into the body, cause the formation of a lot more scar tissue around the nerve etc, and threaten the nerve with razor sharp objects.

What is the success rate of the surgery? I don't know. And, surgeons and I have different definitions of 'success'.

Could it screw you up for life? It could. The chances of that depends on the surgeon and other variables.

Have you ice dipped your feet?

The ice dip is low tech, but it lowers pain levels, period.

Let me know.


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